Allergic Conjuctivitis

Allergic conjunctivitis is an inflammation of the conjunctiva of the eye. This is the tissue lining the eyelids and covering the whites of the eye. When someone has allergic conjunctivitis the lids are swollen and angry looking and the whites of the eye are red and bloodshot. In most cases of conjunctivitis, no matter what the cause, people will experience: blurred vision, itching, running tearing eyes, swelling, irritation and pain.
There are ways to relieve symptoms without actually treating the causes. If you wear contact lenses remove them. Better still, check to make sure you are not allergic or sensitive to your contact lens solutions; this can be a very common cause of allergic conjunctivitis. Use cold compresses to relieve swelling in and around the eyes. Used tea bags and sliced cucumbers make excellent cold compresses and are very soothing to sore eyes. If you are not allergic to the ingredients, eye drops with artificial tears can be soothing.
Because allergies are the cause of this conjunctivitis, the foremost line of treatment is to identify the allergen, then remove allergen or treat the allergy. Allergies to dust, pollen, smoke, fumes, perfumes and other airborne particles are most likely to be the cause of conjunctivitis.

List of Allergic Conjuctivitis Treatments:

Claritin etc. (Loratadine)

Claritin (loratadine) is one of the most popularly prescribed antihistamines and is available over-the-counter.  It prevents sneezing, runny nose, stuffiness, itching and watering of the eyes in those with allergic rhinitis.  Continue reading…


Allegra (Fexofenadine)

Allegra (Fexofenadine) is a second generation, minimally sedating antihistamine that produced fewer side effects than the first generation antihistamines (diphenhydramine and brompheniramine).  They are less sedating and are not known to cause dizziness or impairment of the cognitive function.  Continue reading…


Optivar (Azelastine)

Azelastine ophthalmic solution is specifically prescribed to treat irritated, watery, itchy eyes caused by seasonal allergic conjunctivitis from airborne allergens (like pollen, pets, or dust).  It is sold under the trade name, Optivar.  Continue reading…


Acular etc. (Ketorolac)

Acular (ketorolac tromethamine) is a non-steroidal medication used to treat itching and swelling of the eye brought about by seasonal allergies.  It is also prescribed to reduce inflammation following cataract surgery and used to alleviate pain and minimizes light-sensitivity following other eye operations.  Continue reading…


Alrex (Loteprednol)

Loteprednol is a type of topical corticosteroid medication that inhibits bodily processes that cause inflammation and swelling of the eye following surgery and infection.  Also, it relieves itching, redness, burning, and photophobia brought about by seasonal allergic conjunctivitis.  Continue reading…


Patanol (Olopatadine Hydrochloride)

Olopatadine hydrochloride is an antihistamine used for treatment of itching, redness, and irritation of the eyes as a result of eye allergy conditions such as allergic conjunctivitis and allergic pink eye.  It works by blocking histamine, a substance in the body that triggers allergic symptoms.  Continue reading…


Artificial tears

Artificial tears are lubricant eye drops or eye ointments used to moisten and relieve the irritation associated with deficient tear production in dry eyes.  They are used also to moisten contact lenses and in eye examinations.  They are composed of water, salts, and polymers without the proteins found in natural tears. Continue reading…


Aromatherapy etc. (Essential Oils)

Aromatherapy is a form of alternative and complimentary medicine using the fragrances from concentrated herbal extracts or essential oils derived from grasses, flowers, leaves, bark, branches, needles, twigs, peel of fruit, and roots of plants for purposes of healing and upliftment of a person’s overall well-being. Continue reading…


Benadryl etc. (Diphenhydramine)

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine that has a sedative effect used in treating allergic reactions.  It works by blocking the effect of histamine at h1 receptor sites and reduce the muscle contractions, thus reducing the onset of allergic symptoms. Continue reading…


Cool compress

Unlike conjunctivitis caused by a bacterial or viral infection, allergic conjunctivitis can be managed by simply placing a cool compress over the eyes to relieve the irritation to help prevent the patient from rubbing their eyes.  Continue reading…