Food Allergies

Food allergies are an adverse reactions to a food triggered by the immune system. These reactions are expressed by certain symptoms which can vary from mild to fatal. Symptoms manifest on the skin (rashes, hives, and eczema), in the digestive system (oral allergy syndrome, abdominal cramps, indigestion, diarrhea, nausea and vomiting), and in the respiratory system (asthma or allergic rhinitis). Anaphylaxis occurs in severe cases. Most common foods causing allergies are: milk, eggs, wheat, soy, Peanuts, nuts, fish, and shellfish.
Most common medical treatments include bronchodilators such as epinephrine (given for severe allergic reactions); antihistamines such as diphenhydramine (Benadryl); and corticosteroids, a cream/ointment which reduces swelling and various symptoms of allergic skin reactions.
Still, like in all allergy cases, avoidance of allergen, in this case food causing allergies, is the most effective treatment.

List of Food Allergies Treatments:

Feingold Diet etc. (Avoiding Food Additives)

The Feingold diet is based on the theory that certain foods and food additives should be eliminated from an individual’s diet to improve overall health and behavioral patterns as well as their learning abilities.  Continue reading…


Diagnostic Test: IgG ELISA/EIA Food Allergy Test

The typical food allergy is a reaction to certain foods that produce a Type I allergic reaction involving IgE (Immunoglobulin E) antibodies with immediate onset of the symptoms minutes after ingesting the food.  Continue reading…


Zantac (Ranitidine)

To prevent the ulcers in the stomach and the intestines, ranitidine, a type of Histamine-2 antagonist, is prescribed.  Histamine-2 antagonists are drugs that hinder the production of acid in the stomach and reducing the chances of causing ulcers.  Continue reading…


EpiPen (Epinephrine (Adrenaline))

Adrenaline (epinephrine) is a natural hormone released in times of stress, during exercise, and in response to low blood sugar.  It conditions the body to be prepared for strenuous activity or life-threatening situations.  Continue reading…


Astelin (Azelastine)

Astelin (Azelastine) is a steroid-free anihistamine nasal spray that provides relief for sneezing, sniffling, congestion, itchy, runny nose, and postnasal drip due to seasonal allergens.  Azelastine is designed to be used twice a day with each dosage providing 12-hour relief.  Continue reading…


Singulair (Montelukast)

Singulair is a prescription medicine approved for control of asthma and allergies.  It can safely be used by adults and children as young as 2 years old for treatment of outdoor allergies, and for children as young as 6 months old for treatment of indoor allergies.  Continue reading…


Allegra (Fexofenadine)

Allegra (Fexofenadine) is a second generation, minimally sedating antihistamine that produced fewer side effects than the first generation antihistamines (diphenhydramine and brompheniramine).  They are less sedating and are not known to cause dizziness or impairment of the cognitive function.  Continue reading…


Rotation Diet

A rotation diet is sometimes recommended to prevent some individuals from developing new allergies as a result of eating the same foods regularly.  The idea is to vary the kinds of foods eaten on a regular basis to reduce the exposure to a potential allergen, hopefully preventing the development of new allergies.  Continue reading…


Benadryl etc. (Diphenhydramine)

Diphenhydramine is an antihistamine that has a sedative effect used in treating allergic reactions.  It works by blocking the effect of histamine at h1 receptor sites and reduce the muscle contractions, thus reducing the onset of allergic symptoms.  Continue reading…


Avoidance Diet

Undiagnosed food allergies are believed to cause many common health complaints and diseases.  The only way to identify someone’s food sensitivities is by letting them undergo an allergy avoidance diet.  Continue reading…


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